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Tag: Gas Law


Graphs of Charles's Law

Charles's law is graphically presented in a volume vs temperature graph. The graph is a straight following the equation y = mx.
3 min read

The Equation of Charles's Law

The law relates volume to temperature. The equation of Charles's law is V = kT.
4 min read

Boyle's Law Worksheet

Boyle's law worksheet
5 min read

Real-life Examples of Boyle's Law

Boyle's law can be found on many everyday activities. The article highlights some of them.
4 min read

Graphs of Boyle's Law

The graph of Boyle's law is pressure-volume graph also known as PV curve, It is plot of pressure vs volume at a constant temperature and amount of gas.
2 min read

The Equation of Boyle's Law

Boyle's law, discovered by Robert Boyle, is an important gas law studied in physics and chemistry. The equation of the law is PV = k.
3 min read

To Verify Boyle's Law Experimentally

Boyle's law states pressure is inversely proportional to volume. This can be verified by experiements. This article discusses one such method.
4 min read

Derivation of Ideal Gas Equation from Kinetic Theory of Gases

Ideal gas equation is PV = nRT. This equation can easily be derived from the combination of Boyle’s law, Charles’s law, and Avogadro’s law. But here, we will derive the equation from the kinetic theory of gases. The kinetic theory of gases is a very important theory which relates macroscopic quantities like pressure to microscopic quantities like the velocity of gas molecules. This equation is applicable only for ideal gases, but be approximated for real gas under some conditions.

9 min read

Ideal Gas Law

The Ideal gas law is also known as general gas law. As the name states the law is applicable under the ideal conditions, not to real gases. The law correlates the pressure, volume, temperature, and amount of gas. It was first formulated by French physicist Émile Clapeyron in 1834.

10 min read

Graham's Law of Diffusion and Effusion

Graham's law of diffusion (or Graham's law of effusion) is a law that expresses the relationship between the rate of diffusion or effusion to molar masses of particles. This empirical law was stated by Scottish chemist Thomas Graham in 1848. He established the relationship through experiments.

9 min read

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